Skip to content

Canada Sees Improvements and Challenges To Stroke Treatment

Canada Sees Improvements and Challenges To Stroke Treatment A new report from Canada's Heart and Stroke Foundation has shown that the country has made large improvements in stroke treatment and prevention, but may soon be faced with greater challenges. According to the report, people who experience strokes are more likely to have better health outcomes than they would have just a few years ago. However, the nation may soon have to brace for an increase in the number of strokes.

Age matters 
Strokes and heart disease become more likely as people age, with men over 45 and post-menopausal women over 55 having the highest cardiovascular risk, according to the Canadian government. As the population ages, higher incidence of the two conditions is also expected. However, 90 percent of Canadians over age 20 have at least one risk factor for heart disease. The Heart and Stroke Foundation reported that people are now more likely to have strokes at a young age than ever and predicted that the trend will continue. Strokes most often occur in people over 70, but the organization's report found that they've increased 24 percent for people in their 50s and 13 percent for those in their 60s. The rate of strokes is predicted to double for people between 20 and 64 in the next 15 years.

Long-term progress 
Despite increasing risk for the condition, the Heart and Stroke Foundation was optimistic about the outlook for patients. Over the last 60 years, the death rate from strokes fell 75 percent, the organization reported. In 2013, there were 165,000 stroke survivors in Canada. However, this progress also represents an increased burden on the health care system, as more people will now need to seek follow​-up treatment for the effects of stroke, such as further hospitalizations or admission to assisted living facilities.

Opportunities for better care 
People admitted to Canadian hospitals after strokes also show more complex health problems now than those who had strokes in previous decades. Conditions such as cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure and coronary heart disease are found in people with strokes more commonly than ever, with two-thirds of people admitted to hospitals for the conditions also having at least one chronic disease. This can complicate the treatment needed after a stroke and increase the burden on caregivers, patients and the health care system.

Although advances have been made nationally in treating and preventing strokes, not all areas of the country are dealing with the problem equally well. People in Quebec and Alberta have a better chance of surviving a stroke than the average Canadian, according to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, while those in Newfoundland and Labrador have the worst outcomes.

Surviving and preventing strokes 
Regardless of national or regional trends, the ways of preventing and treating strokes are the same. The Heart and Stroke Foundation stressed that timing and coordination are critical for increasing survival rates of people who have had a stroke and helping them recover without major disabilities. Due to that, a population that can spot the signs of stroke may be one of the country's best assets for treatment. Since the effects of strokes often keep people who are experiencing them from finding help on their own, being able to recognize the signs in others may be vital.

The Stroke and Heart Foundation recommended seeking medical assistance for people who suddenly show the following symptoms:

  • Trouble speaking, seeing or understanding
  • Numbness or pain in the face, arms or legs
  • Severe headache or dizziness

In terms of prevention, common heart health and senior care recommendations may also reduce the reduce of strokes. Stress management, limiting cigarettes and alcohol, eating a healthy diet, and maintaining an active lifestyle could all play a part in bringing down Canada's stroke rate.

Can A Happy Marriage Benefit Health?

Can A Happy Marriage Benefit Health? Being satisfied with marriage can boost overall life satisfaction and may even improve health, in addition to being desirable on its own. However, a new study has found that marital satisfaction isn't equally important for both partners. Even when the husband in a marriage isn't happy, both spouses can benefit when the wife is pleased, according to research from the University of Michigan and Rutgers University published in the Journal of Marriage and Family.

Read More

Lifestyle Changes May Help Beat Dementia

Lifestyle Changes May Help Beat Dementia A new study has added to the evidence that lifestyle changes could play a major part in preventing Alzheimer's disease, and according to researchers it may be the most conclusive yet. In the study, which was revealed at this year's Alzheimer's Association International Conference, a two-year course of intensive lifestyle changes was linked to better overall brain health, reported Time. Interventions included alterations to diet, exercise and social habits.

Read More

Activities To Celebrate Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Whether you've been affected by breast cancer or not, you probably know someone who has. Each year, one in eight women is diagnosed with breast cancer, BreastCancer.org noted. October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, so here are a few activities you can do to honor and participate in breast cancer awareness. Whether you've been affected by breast cancer or not, you probably know someone who has. Each year, one in eight women is diagnosed with breast cancer, BreastCancer.org noted. October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, so here are a few activities you can do to honor and participate in breast cancer awareness.

Read More

The Various Health Benefits Of Honey

September is National Honey Month. Though unknown to many, honey is a great substitute in foods for sugar. So, in honor of the holiday, here are a few beneficial effects of the sticky, golden goodness.
September is National Honey Month. Though unknown to many, honey is a great substitute in foods for sugar. So, in honor of the holiday, here are a few beneficial effects of the sticky, golden goodness.

Read More

Join Our Newsletter

Senior Eats Read our Food Blog
Care Questionnaire