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Coping with a Sense of Loss When a Loved One Has Dementia

When a senior loved one has Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, the impact on the entire family is significant. The disease is often referred to as “the long goodbye” because it slowly robs a person of their memory and independence, while families watch helplessly.

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Do Memory Screenings Help Identify Alzheimer's Disease?

Forgetfulness and confusion are not always signs of cognitive decline. They can also be side effects of an active retirement lifestyle. In the hustle and bustle of a busy life, we can all forget things. But when these behaviors persist, they can be early warning signs of Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia. There are also health conditions that can cause these symptoms. A vitamin B deficiency, an undiagnosed infection, or an adverse reaction to medication can all cause health issues that mimic the signs of Alzheimer’s.

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Why Exercise is Key for Adults with Parkinson's and Alzheimer’s Disease

Exercise is important at every age. It offers benefits for physical and mental well-being. For older adults, staying active also helps build core strength and protect balance, both of which can lower the risk of falls.

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Anosognosia and Alzheimer's: What Caregivers Should Know

Alzheimer’s, and other forms of dementia, impact the entire family. When a senior loved one is diagnosed with a condition that causes memory impairment, it can take patience and understanding to keep them safe and engaged. Alzheimer’s and other related diseases often cause changes ranging from difficulty with abstract thought to agitation and anxiety. One challenge many families experience is that the person living with the disease doesn’t realize anything is wrong with them.

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Why Consider Memory Care for a Loved One with Dementia?

When a senior loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia, creating a care plan that meets their current and future needs, is an important step. Primary care doctors typically recommend families explore local home care agencies and memory care programs before a crisis occurs so they are not forced to do so under stress.

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Ways to Help a Senior with Alzheimer's Connect with Nature

When you are the caregiver for a family member who has Alzheimer’s or another type of dementia, one goal you might have is to help them feel productive and empowered. As the disease robs people of their abilities, it can be a challenge for loved ones to find ways to protect their self-esteem.

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What to Look for in a Memory Care Community

When a senior in your family has Alzheimer’s or another form of dementia, finding ways to safely provide them with the quality of life they deserve can be challenging. Memory loss, for example, might leave you struggling to come up with meaningful activities for them to enjoy throughout the day. Decreased verbal skills can cause you to worry if you are meeting their physical and emotional needs.

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Art Projects for Seniors with Dementia

Art makes the world better. From the enjoyment that comes from looking at a watercolor painting to creating your own work of art, creativity has a variety of health benefits. Research also shows that engaging in the creative arts improves the lives of adults with dementia.

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